Archive for October, 2009

by / on October 9, 2009 at 1:52 pm / in The Protestant Missions

Failure Of Rice Crop in 1900 in Hondo

The failure of the rice crop in some of the provinces of N-E Hondo caused great distress among the peasantry. By December thousands of people were of food composed largely of acorns and the leaves of vegetables.Christian missionaries were the first to give wide publicity and they took a prominent part in efforts for the relief of those in distress. […]

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by / on October 9, 2009 at 1:43 pm / in The Protestant Missions

Japan in War and Peace (1904-1909)

Count Katsura said the following concerning the war with Russia, Russia at the time a Christian country, “The argument against Japan is sometimes put in this form; Russia stands for Christianity and Japan stands for Buddhism. the truth is that Japan stands for religious freedom. In Japan a man maybe a Buddhist, a Christian, or even a Jew, without suffering […]

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by / on October 9, 2009 at 2:05 am / in Uncategorized

Me and (l-R) Melissa and Anita

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by / on October 7, 2009 at 8:07 am / in Uncategorized

Gweneth Fae

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by / on October 7, 2009 at 7:53 am / in The Protestant Missions

The year 1840-1869

The first missionary sent to Japan by the American Board was the Rev. D.C.Greene. In 1843 a number of British navy officers formed the “Loochoo Naval Mission”. (The Ryukyu Islands, also known as the Nansei Islands (南西諸島, Nansei-shotō?, literally Southwest Islands), is a chain of  in the western Pacific, on the eastern limit of the East China Sea and to […]

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by / on October 7, 2009 at 3:51 am / in The Protestant Missions

Intro

I have just started to read a quit interesting book about the History Of Christianity in Japan. It consists of 2 volumes, covering both the Catholic and protestant missions to Japan! I am reading the Protestant part which covers the period 1850 – 1910! I obtained the books from England where they were part of a church library. Myself I […]

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