Archive for August, 2010

by / on August 15, 2010 at 10:52 pm / in The Protestant Missions

Hundreds of Roman Catholics on their way to exile in Japan!

Some nine months later, Mr. Ensor saw hundreds of Roman Catholics being driven by his house on their way to exile. He says that one night when in an almost despairing frame of mind because of the opposition that was being shown towards Christianity: “I was sitting by myself in my study and heard in the darkness a knock at […]

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by / on August 15, 2010 at 10:26 pm / in The Protestant Missions

Mr. and Mrs. Carrothers of the Presbyterian Mission.

Dr. Verbeck in his “Historical Sketch ” considered that the first school to deserve the name of a distinctly missionary institute was one begun in Tokyo about 1869, by Mr. and Mrs. Carrothers of the Presbyterian Mission. Among the pupils were a few girls, and as these increased in number, it was thought best to form them into a separate […]

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by / on August 15, 2010 at 10:08 pm / in The Protestant Missions

January, 1868, Power was restored to the Emperor!

January, 1868, saw the great revolution by which political power was restored to the Emperor, and a new form of government inaugurated. In May, the American Minister received a set of official gazettes, whose publication had been commenced in Kyoto. They were numbered from one to nine, with the exception that the sixth number was lacking. As this excited curiosity, […]

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by / on August 15, 2010 at 9:54 pm / in The Protestant Missions

Prayer Meeting in Yokohama in 1866!

In 1866, there was sent forth from Yokohama the following address: “Yokohama, Japan, 14th Jan., 18661. ”Brethren in Christ: “A little company of believers of several nationalities residing here have for the last seven days been observing the concert for prayer with you of other lands, and whilst assembled this evening to supplicate the throne of grace in behalf of […]

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by / on August 9, 2010 at 4:15 pm / in The Protestant Missions

First Baptism's: Yano Riuzan and Murata Wakasa and Ayabe in Nagasaki! (May 1866)

In November, 1864, occurred the first recorded baptism on Japanese soil of a Protestant Christian. Rev. J. H. Ballagh has given the following account of this person. (* Missionary Herald, 1864, p. 6g.) “Yano Riuzan, a shaven-headed Buddhist, a yabu-isha or quack doctor, who held an inferior position, was selected by the Shogun’s Council of State for a language teacher […]

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by / on August 9, 2010 at 3:28 pm / in The Protestant Missions

Missionary Conference held at Osaka in 1883!

In a historical sketch prepared for the Missionary Conference held at Osaka in 1883, Dr. Verbeck quoted as follows from various reports that described the conditions under which the early missionaries labored: “The missionaries soon found that they were regarded with great suspicion and closely watched, and all intercourse with them was conducted under strict surveillance.” “No teacher could be […]

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by / on August 9, 2010 at 2:49 pm / in The Protestant Missions

First Protestant missionaries in Japan.

EARLY in 1859, the Mission Board of the American Episcopal Church appointed Rev. John Liggins and Rev. C. M. Williams, both of whom were missionaries in China, to open work in Japan, “requesting them to remove to that empire and to enter upon the missionary work there immediately after receiving these instructions.” Mr. Liggins found that the teaching of English […]

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by / on August 8, 2010 at 2:02 pm / in The Protestant Missions

COMMODORE PERRY and THE OPENING OF THE GATES 1853-1859!

AT last the time had come for Japan to be drawn forth from its long seclusion. The way in which this was accomplished by Commodore Perry has often been described, and here we need concern ourselves with only such particulars as have a direct connection with our subject. When it became known that the United States was fitting out an […]

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