Archive for September, 2010

by / on September 28, 2010 at 11:10 pm / in The Protestant Missions

Joseph Hardy Neesima's Life story and Doshisha.

In 1875 there was begun in Kyoto, though only in a hired building, a school for young men. Previously the missionaries of the American Board had sought to gain an entrance into the old capital of the Empire and a Christian whose home was in Kyoto had joined with another from Kobe in asking the Central Government if a missionary […]

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by / on September 28, 2010 at 10:33 pm / in The Protestant Missions

Question by a Buddhist Priest in Japan: Do foreigners attach a machine to the bodies of the pupils while they sleep?

A statement made in May, 1875, said that there were then not less than ten places in Yokohama, twenty-five in Tokyo, ten in the Kobe-Osaka district, and five in other places, making fifty in all, where regular Christian  services were held as often as once a week, with audiences varying from twenty to two hundred in number. The people were […]

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by / on September 28, 2010 at 9:51 pm / in The Protestant Missions

The Sarah A. Curtis Home funded by Viscount Mori Arinori.

In Tokyo, one of the American Baptist missionaries, at the request of some Buddhist priests who expressed a desire to hear about Christianity, took up his abode in quarters offered him at one of their temples in Shiba. Failing health, however, soon necessitated the withdrawal of this missionary from the field. Mr. Mori Arinori, whose memorial in favour of religious […]

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by / on September 28, 2010 at 5:01 pm / in The Protestant Missions

Nakamura Masanao's conversion to Christianity!

It was in 1873 that Nakamura Masanao, one of the most distinguished scholars in the land, received Christian baptism. Though in after years he did not prove so zealous as had been hoped, his action at this time. In braving the opposition of his associates did much to call attention to Christianity. Another noted scholar, Yasui Chuhei, published under the […]

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by / on September 28, 2010 at 4:44 pm / in The Protestant Missions

Japan changes to the Gregorgian Calendar in 1873!

The second Japanese church was organised in Tokyo, September 20, 1873, by the American Presbyterian Mission. It had the same doctrinal and ecclesiastical basis as the one organised the year before by the Reformed missionaries, and from the latter church came seven of the eight members. Ogawa Yoshiyasu, who afterwards became a prominent minister, was the first elder. It was […]

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by / on September 28, 2010 at 4:07 pm / in The Protestant Missions

The year 1873, was a turning-point in the history of Christianity in Japan.

The year 1873, was a turning-point in the history of Christianity in Japan. The attitude of the Government suddenly changed. A few newspapers had been established, and in one of these that was published in Kobe there appeared, in April, an article written by a young man who was then a student in America, and who at a later date […]

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by / on September 14, 2010 at 10:40 pm / in The Protestant Missions

Japanese arguments against Christianity!

IN 1868, there was circulated in Kyushu a pamphlet that may well be given in full, as it shows how the Japanese looked upon the missionaries and their religion. It also narrates from a different point of view some of the events described in previous chapters. TALES OF NAGASAKI— THE STORY OF THE EVIL DOCTRINE The Roman Catholic Religion At […]

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by / on September 13, 2010 at 10:03 pm / in The Protestant Missions

The translation of the Bible in Japanese and “There is a Happy Land," and "Jesus Loves Me."

In the first period of missionary effort a beginning had been made towards providing a Kiristian literature. Reference has already been made to some of the works that were published. It will be convenient here to give a more detailed account; and since the translation of the Bible is one of the first things to take the attention of Protestant […]

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by / on September 3, 2010 at 10:26 pm / in The Protestant Missions

Prince Iwakura visits the United States and Europe.

Near the close of the year 1871, an embassy headed by Prince Iwakura had set forth to visit the United States and Europe. Its chief object was to secure such a revision of the treaties as would do away with extra-territoriality. In the letter of credence presented by Iwakura to the President of the United States, the Emperor declared: ” […]

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by / on September 3, 2010 at 9:58 pm / in The Protestant Missions

William Elliot Griffis (September 17, 1843 – February 5, 1928)

In the early part of 1871, Mr. W. E. Griffis (who afterwards wrote many well-known books upon Japan) went to Fukui as a teacher of English; and in the latter part of the same year Mr. E. W. Clark went in the same capacity to Shizuoka. Both of these gentlemen found opportunities for doing Christian work while in these interior […]

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