Archive for March, 2011

by / on March 30, 2011 at 3:07 am / in The Protestant Missions

The danger of becoming Luke warm!

The cause: Some of the causes of the lull in Christian work were in the Church itself. The early fervor had to some extent passed away. Whereas all of the Christians had once felt the responsibility for telling others about their new faith, and had been earnest in leading their friends to accept it, they were now inclined to leave […]

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by / on March 30, 2011 at 2:29 am / in The Protestant Missions

Tumultuous times for Japan!

The assassination of Viscount Mori Important political events excited the minds of the people and made it harder to gain their attention for the consideration of Christianity. February 11, 1889, the new Constitution was promulgated. The conflict of new and old ideas was exemplified the same day by the assassination of Viscount Mori, the Minister of Education, because of an […]

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by / on March 30, 2011 at 2:08 am / in The Protestant Missions

The beginning of stumped growth!

Many reasons: JAPAN is a country of sudden changes. The bright prospects that gave rise to the hope that the country would be speedily evangelized were soon clouded over. Missionaries are usually optimists, and it seemed to most of them that the storm would quickly pass and the sun would then shine out as brightly as before. In the correspondence […]

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by / on March 29, 2011 at 8:59 am / in The Protestant Missions

The end of rapid growth!

Some statistics The period of rapid development may be considered as closing with the year 1888. The check was not so sudden that the succeeding years did not show considerable growth; such growth, indeed, as in some other countries would have filled the hearts of missionaries with great joy. Those in Japan had seen such rapid growth that their hopes […]

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by / on March 29, 2011 at 8:20 am / in The Protestant Missions

the continuing ministry in the prisons!

In sad contrast with the Kindergartens where laughing, innocent children engage in happy games and pleasant occupations are the prisons with their bars and locks, and with the clanking chains that fetter the movements of the gloomy inmates. Yet Christianity seeks everywhere its opportunities to help men, and He who took the children in His arms to bless them said […]

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by / on March 29, 2011 at 7:24 am / in The Protestant Missions

The Young Men’s Christian Association formed!

Christian students were to be found in other than Christian schools, A graduate of the Doshisha, who was continuing his studies in the First Higher Middle School in Tokyo, conceived the plan of having a Young Men’s Christian Association to bind together the believers that were in that school, the Imperial University, and the High Commercial School. It was feared […]

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by / on March 29, 2011 at 4:14 am / in The Protestant Missions

In 1888 the Christian schools of Japan were at the height of their prosperity.

In 1888 the Christian schools of Japan were at the height of their prosperity. For example, the Doshisha had in its Theological Department 80 pupils; in the Academic Department, 410; in the Preparatory Department, 208; and in the Girls’ School, 180. One teacher wrote: “We should be quite overwhelmed with students if we had not made a strict resolution not […]

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by / on March 29, 2011 at 3:24 am / in The Protestant Missions

In 1867 hundreds of Japanese went to Hawaii!

  Running the sugar plantations       As early as 1867 a company of several hundred Japanese had gone to Hawaii, where they found employment on sugar plantations. When the Imperial Government was established in power, it for a long time did not favor the emigration of its subjects; but in 1885 a treaty negotiated with Hawaii opened the […]

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by / on March 23, 2011 at 2:45 am / in The Protestant Missions

The great October, 1891, earthquake in Gifu and Ogaki-Mino-Owari earthquake!

In October, 1891, a terrible earthquake that had its center near the cities of Gifu and Ogaki, resulted in the loss of eight thousand lives, the wounding of fifteen thousand persons, and the complete or partial destruction of more than one hundred thousand houses. The missionaries living in Gifu and Nagoya at once exerted themselves to help the suffering. As […]

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by / on March 17, 2011 at 8:58 am / in The Protestant Missions

The Rev. A.M. Knapp and the American Unitarian Association in Japan!

The  arrival of Unitarianism in Japan It was in part owing to the suggestions of Japanese who, while abroad, had come in contact with Unitarianism, that the American Unitarian Association decided to send Rev. A. M. Knapp to Japan as a representative of its faith. Reaching Japan in 1887, he preferred not to be called a missionary but an envoy […]

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