Roman Catholic Missions

by / on April 13, 2010 at 11:06 am / in Roman Catholic Missions

Shimabara Revolution continued!

As the English factory had been discontinued, the Dutch were now the only Europeans remaining in Japan. They did not escape suspicion, notwithstanding their attempts to make it plain that their religion was very different from that of the Spanish and Portuguese. In 1640, they came very near to getting into serious trouble through having inscribed the Christian date on […]

Read more ›
by / on April 9, 2010 at 9:56 pm / in Roman Catholic Missions

SHIMABARA REBELLION

The new Lord of Arima exhibited like cruelty towards those whose only offense was a belief in Christianity. He soon gained the reputation of being the most successful extortioner of recantations that Japan had yet seen. His son, Matsukura Shigetsugu, who succeeded him in 1630, imitated his father’s virulence against the Christians, but was not so skillful a ruler. He […]

Read more ›
by / on April 7, 2010 at 12:20 pm / in Roman Catholic Missions

Hidetada

Ieyasu died June 1, 1616. This brought no relief to the Christians, for Hidetada was more violent against them than his father had ever been. Will Adams wrote: “Now this year 1616, the old Emperor died. His son reigned in his place, and he is more hot against the Romish religion than his father was: for he hath forbidden through […]

Read more ›
by / on March 29, 2010 at 10:14 pm / in Roman Catholic Missions

The embarkation of the exiles took place on the seventh of November!

The embarkation of the exiles took place on the seventh of November. Three small junks, in such poor condition as to be hardly seaworthy, were employed. One of these was sent to Manila. Among those on board were Takayama Ukon and John Naito with their families, Julia Naito with fourteen of her companions, two secular priests, and about thirty members […]

Read more ›
by / on March 29, 2010 at 9:42 pm / in Roman Catholic Missions

The change in Ieyasu's attitude toward Christianity began to manifest itself in 1612.

The change in Ieyasu’s attitude toward Christianity began to manifest itself in 1612. Mention has already been made of the way his suspicions were aroused that year by the soundings that the Spaniards made along the coast. His displeasure was also excited against a Christian named Okamoto Daihachi, the secretary of an officer who was practically Ieyasu’s prime minister and […]

Read more ›
by / on March 22, 2010 at 11:54 am / in Roman Catholic Missions

INTERESTING BITS OF HISTORY

Two ships sent out by the Dutch East India company reached Japan in July, 1609, and the kindness that the Daimyo of Hirado had shown to the Hollanders, who had been Will Adam’s companions, was no requited by having that city chosen as the place for a new factory that was established by their countrymen. Not quite two months after […]

Read more ›
by / on March 21, 2010 at 3:27 am / in Roman Catholic Missions

INCREASED PERSECUTION UNDER IEYASU (1598-1616)

Hideyoshi, shortly before his death, had appointed a board of five Regents, with Tokugawa Ieyasu at their head. Under their direction was another board of five ministers. To these last was committed the care of Hideyoshi’s son, Hideyori, who was then six years old. Ieyasu, who was born in 1542, had served under both Nobunaga and Hideyoshi. His original territories […]

Read more ›
by / on March 15, 2010 at 12:07 pm / in Roman Catholic Missions

The 26 martyrs of Nagasaki!

The other memorial, which was presented to the Pope in March, 1598, said that it was not hatred of Christianity but fear of the excessive power of the Jesuits that led Hideyoshi to oppose their teaching ; that the Jesuits alone were proscribed, while the Franciscans had been treated with honor and given liberty to preach the Gospel, which they […]

Read more ›
by / on March 14, 2010 at 12:43 pm / in Roman Catholic Missions

Kami From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Kami (神?) is the Japanese word for the spirits, natural forces, or essence in the Shinto faith. Although the word is sometimes translated as “god” or “deity,” some Shinto scholars argue that such a translation can cause a misunderstanding of the term (Ono, 1962). Kami’s wide variety of usage can be compared to the Sanskrit Deva and the Hebrew Elohim, […]

Read more ›
by / on March 14, 2010 at 12:25 pm / in Roman Catholic Missions

Toyotomi Hideyoshi (豊臣 秀吉, February 2, 1536 – September 18, 1598) was a daimyo in the Sengoku period who unified the political factions of Japan. He succeeded his former liege lord, Oda Nobunaga, and brought an end to the Sengoku period. The period of his rule is often called the Momoyama period, named after Hideyoshi’s castle. He is noted for […]

Read more ›