Roman Catholic Missions

by / on March 14, 2010 at 11:50 am / in Roman Catholic Missions

HIDEYOSHI AND HIS EDICTS

The Governor of Kyoto induced Hideyoshi to revise the letter that he had intended to send to the Viceroy. It had been written in a haughty tone and accused the missionaries of many evil deeds. The letter as finally sent was without these charges and, as the following extract shows, the objections urged against the work of the Jesuits were […]

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by / on March 14, 2010 at 12:23 am / in Roman Catholic Missions

HIDEYOSHI AND HIS EDICTS AGAINST CHRISTIANITY 1583-1598.

A conversion that attracted much attention about this time was that of Imaoji Dosan, Hideyoshi’s physician, a man who had been educated in the best schools of Japan and China, and who was the most celebrated practitioner in the country. Father Figueredo had occasion to consult this physician. Dosan, surprised to see a person of so great age whose general […]

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by / on March 14, 2010 at 12:00 am / in Roman Catholic Missions

The Daimyos of Omura and Arima sending an embassy to Europe to visit the Pope!

A few months before the assassination of Nobunaga, the ex-Daimyo of Bungo united with the Daimyos of Omura and Arima in sending an embassy to Europe. It is probable that the first suggestion of this came from the Jesuits, who desired on the one hand to arouse missionary enthusiasm in Europe and on the other to impress the envoys with […]

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by / on March 11, 2010 at 12:54 am / in Roman Catholic Missions

The Japanese Jezebel!

Nobunaga’s dislike of the Buddhist priests made him the more ready to favor a religion whose success would help to undermine their power. In one of the letters that were sent by the missionaries as reports of their work it was said of him:  “This man seems to have been chosen by God to open and prepare the way for […]

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by / on March 8, 2010 at 1:55 pm / in Roman Catholic Missions

The continuing story!

In June 1567, Juan Fernandez, who had come to Japan with Xavier, died at the age of 42. But what is told of him encourages the opinion that no one deserves so much as he to be called the founder of the early Japanese Church. He was more successful than Xavier and Torres in learning the language. It is said, […]

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by / on March 5, 2010 at 1:19 pm / in Roman Catholic Missions

The Japanese Mordecai and Haman!

Suddenly, just when it seemed as though the capital and surrounding regions were on the point of being completely won to Christianity, the work was interrupted by political disturbances. In the summer of 1565 the Shogun was murdered. The members of his family, with the exception of one younger brother who had become a priest, were also put to death, […]

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by / on March 4, 2010 at 12:31 pm / in Roman Catholic Missions

Takayama Ukon.

Dom Justo Takayama From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Dom Justo Takayama (1552 – February 4, 1615) was a kirishitan daimyo and the Japanese Samurai who followed Christianity in the Sengoku period of Japan. Takayama Justo was born to be the heir of Takayama Tomoteru, the lord of Sawa Castle in the Yamato Province. His name as a child was Hikogorō […]

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by / on March 4, 2010 at 12:12 pm / in Roman Catholic Missions

Omura Sumitada and Takayama Ukon!

Torres and Fernandez also hastened to Omura, where they met Sumitada, who assured them that it was his desire not to fall at all behind Otomo Yoshishige in his treatment of the missionaries and their converts. Yokoseura, which had been only a little village, quickly grew to be a flourishing town. The Portuguese merchant made it their chief port, and […]

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by / on March 2, 2010 at 12:58 pm / in Roman Catholic Missions

Omura Sumitada

Ōmura Sumitada From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Ōmura Sumitada (大村純忠, 1533-June 23, 1587) Japanese daimyo lord of the Sengoku period. He achieved fame throughout the country for being the first of the daimyo to convert to Christianity following the arrival of the Jesuit missionaries in the mid-16th century. Following his baptism, he was known as “Dom Bartholomew”. Sumitada is also […]

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by / on March 2, 2010 at 12:34 pm / in Roman Catholic Missions

Various excempts!

Vilela had gained the favor of Miyoshi, one of the shogun’s ministers. Thus the missionaries received permission to preach and proclamations were posted throughout the city.  A great sensation was caused by the conversion of one of the Buddhist priests who had a great reputation for scholarship. It is said that among the writings adorning the walls of his room […]

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