The Protestant Missions

by / on March 29, 2011 at 7:24 am / in The Protestant Missions

The Young Men’s Christian Association formed!

Christian students were to be found in other than Christian schools, A graduate of the Doshisha, who was continuing his studies in the First Higher Middle School in Tokyo, conceived the plan of having a Young Men’s Christian Association to bind together the believers that were in that school, the Imperial University, and the High Commercial School. It was feared […]

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by / on March 29, 2011 at 4:14 am / in The Protestant Missions

In 1888 the Christian schools of Japan were at the height of their prosperity.

In 1888 the Christian schools of Japan were at the height of their prosperity. For example, the Doshisha had in its Theological Department 80 pupils; in the Academic Department, 410; in the Preparatory Department, 208; and in the Girls’ School, 180. One teacher wrote: “We should be quite overwhelmed with students if we had not made a strict resolution not […]

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by / on March 29, 2011 at 3:24 am / in The Protestant Missions

In 1867 hundreds of Japanese went to Hawaii!

  Running the sugar plantations       As early as 1867 a company of several hundred Japanese had gone to Hawaii, where they found employment on sugar plantations. When the Imperial Government was established in power, it for a long time did not favor the emigration of its subjects; but in 1885 a treaty negotiated with Hawaii opened the […]

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by / on March 23, 2011 at 2:45 am / in The Protestant Missions

The great October, 1891, earthquake in Gifu and Ogaki-Mino-Owari earthquake!

In October, 1891, a terrible earthquake that had its center near the cities of Gifu and Ogaki, resulted in the loss of eight thousand lives, the wounding of fifteen thousand persons, and the complete or partial destruction of more than one hundred thousand houses. The missionaries living in Gifu and Nagoya at once exerted themselves to help the suffering. As […]

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by / on March 17, 2011 at 8:58 am / in The Protestant Missions

The Rev. A.M. Knapp and the American Unitarian Association in Japan!

The  arrival of Unitarianism in Japan It was in part owing to the suggestions of Japanese who, while abroad, had come in contact with Unitarianism, that the American Unitarian Association decided to send Rev. A. M. Knapp to Japan as a representative of its faith. Reaching Japan in 1887, he preferred not to be called a missionary but an envoy […]

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by / on March 17, 2011 at 7:59 am / in The Protestant Missions

High hopes succeeded by disappointment in Oyamada, Chikugo province!

                                                The story of Oyamada: The way in which high hopes were sometimes succeeded by disappointment was exemplified in Oyamada, a farming village in the province of Chikugo. It was defeated in a lawsuit that it had […]

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by / on March 17, 2011 at 12:43 am / in The Protestant Missions

The Visit of George Müller to Japan in 1887!

The year 1887 saw the opening of two forms of philanthropic work — the Nurses Training School in Kyoto, and the Orphan Asylum in Okayama. The former was established through the efforts of J. C. Berry, M.D., and from the first won the good will of the Japanese people. Its graduates were not only in demand for private nursing, but […]

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by / on March 14, 2011 at 1:31 pm / in The Protestant Missions

The Great Kanto and Tohoku Earth Quake, Tsunami and Nuclear Disaster of March 2011!

  It has been almost unimaginable to watch the news and the account of what happened. As of now, perhaps 20.000 people may have lost their lives. There is still a nuclear disaster unfolding and the survivors are in desperate need of water,food and blankets. It is still quite cold here and will be so for some time to come. […]

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by / on March 10, 2011 at 6:47 am / in The Protestant Missions

The November, 1886, noteworthy revival in Sendai!

Manifestations of the Holy Spirit! While most of the churches were rejoicing in great prosperity, there were in several places special manifestations of the Holy Spirit’s presence. A letter describing what occurred in the Girls’ School connected with the English Church Mission in Osaka says: “The blessing of a revival which God graciously granted to many of his servants in […]

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by / on March 10, 2011 at 6:25 am / in The Protestant Missions

Mrs. Mary Greenleaf Clement Leavitt and the Christian Temperance Society.

The year 1886 witnessed a renewed interest in the cause of temperance. This was aroused by lectures delivered in many cities by Mrs. Mary Greenleaf Clement Leavitt, who had come from America as the representative of the Woman’s Christian Temperance Union. Several temperance societies were formed under Christian auspices, though in many cases persons of other faiths became members. One […]

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