The Protestant Missions

by / on March 10, 2011 at 6:07 am / in The Protestant Missions

Girls desperation for education resulted in suicide!

A school opens in Niigata Somewhat similar to the history of the first of these Sendai schools was that of one opened in Niigata, although in this case the leading trustees were Christians. The school met with much opposition from Buddhists and others. It also suffered from internal dissensions; one of its presidents and afterwards the principal of the school […]

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by / on March 5, 2011 at 1:16 pm / in The Protestant Missions

The Story of Tohoku Gakuin!

The desire for Western civilization was naturally accompanied by increased interest in the study of the English language. In 1885 forty thousand books were imported from England and fifty-nine thousand from America; while in 1886 the numbers increased to eighty-five thousand and one hundred and nineteen thousand respectively. The efforts of the Government to have English taught in the public […]

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by / on March 5, 2011 at 12:08 pm / in The Protestant Missions

Educating girls of the higher classes.

Professor Toyama of the Imperial University: Several essays published in 1886 by Japanese writers are noteworthy for the favourable, though patronising, tone in which they speak of Christianity. Professor Toyama of the Imperial University, in an article on the education of girls, said that it would be a great advantage if they could be instructed by European or American ladies. […]

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by / on March 4, 2011 at 1:43 pm / in The Protestant Missions

Reaching the Ainu in Japan!

Three new missions in Japan In 1885 three new missions began work in Japan. They were those of the Presbyterian Church of the United States, of the American Society of Friends, and of the Evangelical Protestant Missionary Society (German and Swiss). As this last society is not well known by American and English Christians, and as its principles and methods differ […]

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by / on November 22, 2010 at 10:58 pm / in The Protestant Missions

Shinto and Buddhist Official Priesthood abolished and Yaso Taiji!

In August, 1884, the Government issued a notification to the effect that “the Shinto and Buddhist Official Priesthood has been abolished, and the power of appointing and discharging incumbents of religious temples and monasteries, and the promotion and degradation in rank of preceptors, has been transferred to the religious superintendents of those sects;” under certain regulations that were of such […]

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by / on November 22, 2010 at 10:15 pm / in The Protestant Missions

Aoyama Gakuin and Toyo Eiwa Gakko established!

The educational work carried on by the different missions kept pace with the rapid advance in other directions. Already in 1883 the Methodist Episcopal Mission had established in Tokyo the Aoyama Gakuin, comprising a theological school, a college, and an academy for boys; as also a seminary for girls. In 1884 the Canadian Methodists opened the Toyo Eiwa Gakko in […]

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by / on November 17, 2010 at 10:44 pm / in The Protestant Missions

Mr. Fukuzawa Yukichi opposition to Christianity and Count Itagaki.

It will be remembered that so late as 1881 Mr. Fukuzawa Yukichi had published essays in which he opposed Christianity as dangerous to the nation, and had even gone so far as to urge that the Government take measures to prevent its extension. It seems very strange to find this leader of public opinion publishing only three years later an […]

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by / on November 17, 2010 at 10:06 pm / in The Protestant Missions

The Young Man from Doshisha and the Rebaiburu.

The year 1884 saw the movement in favour of Christianity extending and deepening. It was about this time that the word rebaiburu (revival) gained a place in the vocabulary of the Christians; and there was constant occasion for its use in connection with the spiritual awakenings that took place in the churches and Christian schools. One of the most marked […]

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by / on November 1, 2010 at 10:08 pm / in The Protestant Missions

The Day of Pentecost for Japan! (VI RAPID GROWTH I883-I888

We have now reached the time when the growth of the Protestant churches and the eagerness of the people to learn about Christianity were such as to arouse the highest hopes of the missionaries, and to excite the wonder of the whole Christian world. Many persons were led to ask the old question with a tone that implied an affirmative […]

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by / on October 29, 2010 at 9:48 pm / in The Protestant Missions

Joseph Cook, the well-known Boston lecturer, visited Japan in1882.

Joseph Cook, the well-known Boston lecturer, visited Japan in 1882, and through interpreters addressed many large audiences. He was the first of the noted Christian speakers from abroad that have gone to Japan for such purposes, and his vigorous words attracted much attention. He was invited to speak in Kyoto by some prominent members of the Prefectural Assembly. Hiring a […]

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