The Protestant Missions

by / on October 21, 2010 at 9:30 pm / in The Protestant Missions

Alexander Williamson's "Natural Theology."

About the beginning of the year 1877 a Japanese Christian received from the Government permission to translate and publish Williamson’s “Natural Theology.” This is worthy of notice because, so far as known, it was the first permission given for the publication of a distinctively Christian book. The work was spreading into the interior in various directions. In January, Rev. G. […]

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by / on October 21, 2010 at 6:39 pm / in The Protestant Missions

Rev. J.L. Atkinson's visit to Matsuyama!

The church in Kobe received a request from two men living in Matsuyama, a city about two hundred miles distant on the island of Shikoku, asking that someone be sent to preach the Christian religion to themselves and there friends. There being no one who could go for permanent residence, Rev. J.L. Atkinson, a missionary of the American board, decided […]

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by / on October 21, 2010 at 3:40 pm / in The Protestant Missions

Zeal of the Kumamoto Band of Brothers!

On the last Sunday of January 1876, a number of young men from the city of Kumamoto went to a hill on the outskirts of town, where they entered into a solemn covenant pledging themselves to follow Christ and to “Enlighten the darkness of the empire by preaching the Gospel, Even at the sacrifice of their lives” They were pupils […]

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by / on October 2, 2010 at 9:52 pm / in The Protestant Missions

The first Christian newspaper in Japan: Shichi Ichi Zappo!

In May, Rev. W. Dening, of the Church Missionary Society, opened a service in what had formerly been a large shop on the main street of Hakodate. On the second Sunday he baptised in the presence of a large crowd Mr. Ogawa, who afterwards became a prominent evangelist. Soon after this, active opposition began, Mr. Ogawa being annoyed and persecuted […]

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by / on September 28, 2010 at 11:10 pm / in The Protestant Missions

Joseph Hardy Neesima's Life story and Doshisha.

In 1875 there was begun in Kyoto, though only in a hired building, a school for young men. Previously the missionaries of the American Board had sought to gain an entrance into the old capital of the Empire and a Christian whose home was in Kyoto had joined with another from Kobe in asking the Central Government if a missionary […]

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by / on September 28, 2010 at 10:33 pm / in The Protestant Missions

Question by a Buddhist Priest in Japan: Do foreigners attach a machine to the bodies of the pupils while they sleep?

A statement made in May, 1875, said that there were then not less than ten places in Yokohama, twenty-five in Tokyo, ten in the Kobe-Osaka district, and five in other places, making fifty in all, where regular Christian  services were held as often as once a week, with audiences varying from twenty to two hundred in number. The people were […]

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by / on September 28, 2010 at 9:51 pm / in The Protestant Missions

The Sarah A. Curtis Home funded by Viscount Mori Arinori.

In Tokyo, one of the American Baptist missionaries, at the request of some Buddhist priests who expressed a desire to hear about Christianity, took up his abode in quarters offered him at one of their temples in Shiba. Failing health, however, soon necessitated the withdrawal of this missionary from the field. Mr. Mori Arinori, whose memorial in favour of religious […]

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by / on September 28, 2010 at 5:01 pm / in The Protestant Missions

Nakamura Masanao's conversion to Christianity!

It was in 1873 that Nakamura Masanao, one of the most distinguished scholars in the land, received Christian baptism. Though in after years he did not prove so zealous as had been hoped, his action at this time. In braving the opposition of his associates did much to call attention to Christianity. Another noted scholar, Yasui Chuhei, published under the […]

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by / on September 28, 2010 at 4:44 pm / in The Protestant Missions

Japan changes to the Gregorgian Calendar in 1873!

The second Japanese church was organised in Tokyo, September 20, 1873, by the American Presbyterian Mission. It had the same doctrinal and ecclesiastical basis as the one organised the year before by the Reformed missionaries, and from the latter church came seven of the eight members. Ogawa Yoshiyasu, who afterwards became a prominent minister, was the first elder. It was […]

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by / on September 28, 2010 at 4:07 pm / in The Protestant Missions

The year 1873, was a turning-point in the history of Christianity in Japan.

The year 1873, was a turning-point in the history of Christianity in Japan. The attitude of the Government suddenly changed. A few newspapers had been established, and in one of these that was published in Kobe there appeared, in April, an article written by a young man who was then a student in America, and who at a later date […]

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