The Protestant Missions

by / on September 14, 2010 at 10:40 pm / in The Protestant Missions

Japanese arguments against Christianity!

IN 1868, there was circulated in Kyushu a pamphlet that may well be given in full, as it shows how the Japanese looked upon the missionaries and their religion. It also narrates from a different point of view some of the events described in previous chapters. TALES OF NAGASAKI— THE STORY OF THE EVIL DOCTRINE The Roman Catholic Religion At […]

Read more ›
by / on September 13, 2010 at 10:03 pm / in The Protestant Missions

The translation of the Bible in Japanese and “There is a Happy Land," and "Jesus Loves Me."

In the first period of missionary effort a beginning had been made towards providing a Kiristian literature. Reference has already been made to some of the works that were published. It will be convenient here to give a more detailed account; and since the translation of the Bible is one of the first things to take the attention of Protestant […]

Read more ›
by / on September 3, 2010 at 10:26 pm / in The Protestant Missions

Prince Iwakura visits the United States and Europe.

Near the close of the year 1871, an embassy headed by Prince Iwakura had set forth to visit the United States and Europe. Its chief object was to secure such a revision of the treaties as would do away with extra-territoriality. In the letter of credence presented by Iwakura to the President of the United States, the Emperor declared: ” […]

Read more ›
by / on September 3, 2010 at 9:58 pm / in The Protestant Missions

William Elliot Griffis (September 17, 1843 – February 5, 1928)

In the early part of 1871, Mr. W. E. Griffis (who afterwards wrote many well-known books upon Japan) went to Fukui as a teacher of English; and in the latter part of the same year Mr. E. W. Clark went in the same capacity to Shizuoka. Both of these gentlemen found opportunities for doing Christian work while in these interior […]

Read more ›
by / on August 15, 2010 at 10:52 pm / in The Protestant Missions

Hundreds of Roman Catholics on their way to exile in Japan!

Some nine months later, Mr. Ensor saw hundreds of Roman Catholics being driven by his house on their way to exile. He says that one night when in an almost despairing frame of mind because of the opposition that was being shown towards Christianity: “I was sitting by myself in my study and heard in the darkness a knock at […]

Read more ›
by / on August 15, 2010 at 10:26 pm / in The Protestant Missions

Mr. and Mrs. Carrothers of the Presbyterian Mission.

Dr. Verbeck in his “Historical Sketch ” considered that the first school to deserve the name of a distinctly missionary institute was one begun in Tokyo about 1869, by Mr. and Mrs. Carrothers of the Presbyterian Mission. Among the pupils were a few girls, and as these increased in number, it was thought best to form them into a separate […]

Read more ›
by / on August 15, 2010 at 10:08 pm / in The Protestant Missions

January, 1868, Power was restored to the Emperor!

January, 1868, saw the great revolution by which political power was restored to the Emperor, and a new form of government inaugurated. In May, the American Minister received a set of official gazettes, whose publication had been commenced in Kyoto. They were numbered from one to nine, with the exception that the sixth number was lacking. As this excited curiosity, […]

Read more ›
by / on August 15, 2010 at 9:54 pm / in The Protestant Missions

Prayer Meeting in Yokohama in 1866!

In 1866, there was sent forth from Yokohama the following address: “Yokohama, Japan, 14th Jan., 18661. ”Brethren in Christ: “A little company of believers of several nationalities residing here have for the last seven days been observing the concert for prayer with you of other lands, and whilst assembled this evening to supplicate the throne of grace in behalf of […]

Read more ›
by / on August 9, 2010 at 4:15 pm / in The Protestant Missions

First Baptism's: Yano Riuzan and Murata Wakasa and Ayabe in Nagasaki! (May 1866)

In November, 1864, occurred the first recorded baptism on Japanese soil of a Protestant Christian. Rev. J. H. Ballagh has given the following account of this person. (* Missionary Herald, 1864, p. 6g.) “Yano Riuzan, a shaven-headed Buddhist, a yabu-isha or quack doctor, who held an inferior position, was selected by the Shogun’s Council of State for a language teacher […]

Read more ›
by / on August 9, 2010 at 3:28 pm / in The Protestant Missions

Missionary Conference held at Osaka in 1883!

In a historical sketch prepared for the Missionary Conference held at Osaka in 1883, Dr. Verbeck quoted as follows from various reports that described the conditions under which the early missionaries labored: “The missionaries soon found that they were regarded with great suspicion and closely watched, and all intercourse with them was conducted under strict surveillance.” “No teacher could be […]

Read more ›