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by / on June 25, 2010 at 11:46 am / in Roman Catholic Missions

THE CATHOLIC MISSIONS IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY 1901-1909

The interests of the Church in Japan, as has been seen, were for a long time entrusted to the Societe des Missions Etrangeres of Paris and thus, nearly all of missionaries were French. After the Spanish -American war many of the Dominicans removed from the Philippine Islands, and in 1904, the Propaganda having caused the Islands of Shikoku, which then […]

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by / on June 17, 2010 at 3:41 pm / in Roman Catholic Missions

DEVELOPMENT OF THE CHURCH (1873-1900)

Not only in the open port but also in the interior, there was an increasing number of conversions. In August 1875,one of the missionaries baptized in the village of Matsunaga (Suruga) thirty persons who had received instruction from a catechist. Soon after this, the number of worshippers at the annual festival of a Shinto shrine in the neighboring city of […]

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by / on June 7, 2010 at 9:56 am / in Roman Catholic Missions

EDICTS AGAINST THE CHRISTIANS REMOVED. PRISONERS FREED!

Rumors of a change in the policy of the Government increased. By the end of 1872, the exiles were receiving more lenient treatment, and there were many indications that brighter days were at hand. “EDICTS AGAINST THE CHRISTIANS REMOVED. PRISONERS FREED. INFORM ROME, PROPAGATION OF FAITH, HOLY INFANCY. NEED IMMEDIATELY FIFTEEN MISSIONARIES.” Such was the message written in March 1873, […]

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by / on June 4, 2010 at 11:18 pm / in Roman Catholic Missions

More Persecution!

November 12, in Hisakashima, a small island belonging to the Goto group, twenty-two heads of families were arrested and taken to the chief town of the islands. Immediately afterward, with the exception of six young men who escaped, the whole remaining population, men, women, and children one hundred and eighty-one persons in a ll, were shut up in the house […]

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by / on May 10, 2010 at 6:08 pm / in Roman Catholic Missions

Persecution 1867~1873 (part 2)

In October, 1867, Mgr. Petitjean went to France and Rome in order to plead the cause of his Mission. His attempts to induce Napoleon III. to make a  benevolent intervention in favor of the persecuted Christians were of no avail, the Emperor saying that nothing could be done except in concert with the other Powers. It was in the absence […]

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by / on May 10, 2010 at 5:39 pm / in Roman Catholic Missions

Persecution 1867~1873, Part 1

  It had been the custom of the Christians to avoid trouble by joining with others in making contributions to the temples, and by allowing deceased friends to be buried with Buddhist rites. Those in Urakami now resolved that, whatever might be the consequences, they would make no more girts to temples. In April, 1867, the relatives of a Christian […]

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by / on April 25, 2010 at 11:26 am / in Roman Catholic Missions

The Resurrected Church (1855-1867)

Though the United States in 1854 negotiated a treaty with Japan, this and the similar arrangements made by other Western nations did not provide for the residence of foreigners in the country. It was, however, evident that the first breach had been made in the barriers that shut the Japanese away from other peoples and that the time could not […]

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by / on April 23, 2010 at 9:14 pm / in Roman Catholic Missions

Loochoo (1844-1853)

Though missionaries were unable to enter Japan, the Roman Catholic Church could not forget the land where its efforts had once been crowned with so great success, and where so many martyrs had consecrated the soil by their blood. Many were the prayers that the country which had been the scene of such triumphs and such sufferings might again be […]

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by / on April 21, 2010 at 4:34 pm / in Uncategorized

Chureito Peace Pagoda!

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by / on April 13, 2010 at 11:06 am / in Roman Catholic Missions

Shimabara Revolution continued!

As the English factory had been discontinued, the Dutch were now the only Europeans remaining in Japan. They did not escape suspicion, notwithstanding their attempts to make it plain that their religion was very different from that of the Spanish and Portuguese. In 1640, they came very near to getting into serious trouble through having inscribed the Christian date on […]

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