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by / on April 9, 2010 at 9:56 pm / in Roman Catholic Missions

SHIMABARA REBELLION

The new Lord of Arima exhibited like cruelty towards those whose only offense was a belief in Christianity. He soon gained the reputation of being the most successful extortioner of recantations that Japan had yet seen. His son, Matsukura Shigetsugu, who succeeded him in 1630, imitated his father’s virulence against the Christians, but was not so skillful a ruler. He […]

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by / on April 7, 2010 at 12:20 pm / in Roman Catholic Missions

Hidetada

Ieyasu died June 1, 1616. This brought no relief to the Christians, for Hidetada was more violent against them than his father had ever been. Will Adams wrote: “Now this year 1616, the old Emperor died. His son reigned in his place, and he is more hot against the Romish religion than his father was: for he hath forbidden through […]

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by / on March 29, 2010 at 11:37 pm / in Interesting Japanese Christians!

Murayama Tōan

Murayama Tōan Murayama Tōan Antonio (村山等安)[1] was a 17th-century Japanese Governor of the city of Nagasaki (Nagasaki daikan, 長崎代官). He was born in Nagoya from a humble background,and he was a Christian. He played an important role in the handling of “Nanban trade” in Nagasaki with Christian powers, Murayama went to Nagasaki as a youth and was baptized there, receiving […]

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by / on March 29, 2010 at 10:14 pm / in Roman Catholic Missions

The embarkation of the exiles took place on the seventh of November!

The embarkation of the exiles took place on the seventh of November. Three small junks, in such poor condition as to be hardly seaworthy, were employed. One of these was sent to Manila. Among those on board were Takayama Ukon and John Naito with their families, Julia Naito with fourteen of her companions, two secular priests, and about thirty members […]

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by / on March 29, 2010 at 10:07 pm / in Interesting Japanese Christians!

Dom Justo Takayama-Takayama Ukon.

Dom Justo Takayama From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Dom Justo Takayama (1552 – February 4, 1615) was a kirishitan daimyo and a Japanese Samurai who followed Christianity in the Sengoku period of Japan. Takayama Justo was born to be the heir of Takayama Tomoteru, the lord of Sawa Castle in the Yamato Province. His name as a child was Hikogorō […]

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by / on March 29, 2010 at 9:59 pm / in Interesting Japanese Christians!

Arima Harunobu

Arima Harunobu From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Arima Harunobu (有馬晴信?, 1567-1612) Arima Harunobu was the second son and successor of Japanese daimyo Arima Yoshisada. Harunobu was born in the castle of Arima and controlled the Shimabara area of Hizen province. After Harunobu’s father’s death, he began the persecution of Christians in his region. With Ryūzōji Takanobu expanding into his domain, […]

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by / on March 29, 2010 at 9:42 pm / in Roman Catholic Missions

The change in Ieyasu's attitude toward Christianity began to manifest itself in 1612.

The change in Ieyasu’s attitude toward Christianity began to manifest itself in 1612. Mention has already been made of the way his suspicions were aroused that year by the soundings that the Spaniards made along the coast. His displeasure was also excited against a Christian named Okamoto Daihachi, the secretary of an officer who was practically Ieyasu’s prime minister and […]

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by / on March 22, 2010 at 12:49 pm / in Interesting Japanese Christians!

Luis Sotelo

Luis Sotelo From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Luis Sotelo (September 6, 1574 -1624), was a Franciscan friar who died as a martyr in Japan, in 1624, and was beatified by Pope Pius IX in 1867. Sotelo was born in Sevilla, Spain, and studied at the University of Salamanca before entering the convent of “Calvario de los Hermanos Menores”. He was […]

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by / on March 22, 2010 at 12:39 pm / in Interesting Japanese Christians!

Date Masamune

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Date Masamune (伊達 政宗?) (September 5, 1567 – June 27, 1636) was a Japanese samurai of the Azuchi-Momoyama period through early Edo period. Heir to a long line of powerful daimyo in the Tōhoku region, he went on to found the modern-day city of Sendai. An outstanding tactician, he was made all the more iconic […]

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by / on March 22, 2010 at 11:54 am / in Roman Catholic Missions

INTERESTING BITS OF HISTORY

Two ships sent out by the Dutch East India company reached Japan in July, 1609, and the kindness that the Daimyo of Hirado had shown to the Hollanders, who had been Will Adam’s companions, was no requited by having that city chosen as the place for a new factory that was established by their countrymen. Not quite two months after […]

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