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by / on June 6, 2011 at 2:06 am / in Interesting Japanese Christians!

Tsuda Umeko

Tsuda Umeko (December 31, 1864 – August 16, 1929) was an educator who pioneered in education for women in Meiji period Japan. Originally named Tsuda Mume, with mume or ume referring to the Japanese plum, she went by the name Ume Tsuda while studying in the United States before changing her name to Umeko in 1902. Tsuda Umeko was born […]

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by / on June 5, 2011 at 12:41 pm / in Interesting Japanese Christians!

Paulo Miki

Paulo Miki (パウロ三木, c.1562[1] – 5 February 1597) was a Roman Catholic Japanese Jesuit seminarian, martyr and saint, one of the Twenty-six Martyrs of Japan. Paulo Miki was born into a wealthy Japanese family. He was educated by the Jesuits in Azuchi and Takatsuki. He joined the Society of Jesus and became a well known and successful preacher – gaining […]

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by / on June 5, 2011 at 12:25 pm / in Interesting Japanese Christians!

Magdalene of Nagasaki

Saint Magdalene of Nagasaki (長崎のマグダレナ Nagasaki no Magudarena) was born in 1611 as the daughter of a Christian couple martyred about 1620. With the arrival of the Augustinian Order, Magdalene served as an Augustinian lay sister or tertiary, interpreter and catechist for Fathers Francis of Jesus Terrero and Vincent of Saint Anthony Simoens.In 1632, these two Augustinian friars, who had […]

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by / on June 5, 2011 at 11:59 am / in Interesting Japanese Christians!

Tadao Yanaihara

Tadao Yanaihara (矢内原 忠雄 Yanaihara Tadao, January 27, 1893 – December 25, 1961) was a Japanese economist, educator and Christian pacifist. The first director of Shakai Kagaku Kenkyűjo (Institute of Social Science or Shaken) at the University of Tokyo, studied at Toynbee Hall and School of Economics and Political Science (London School of Economics). Born in Ehime Prefecture, Yanaihara became […]

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by / on June 3, 2011 at 1:11 pm / in Interesting Japanese Christians!

Ōmura Sumitada: Japanese Daimyo!

Ōmura Sumitada From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Ōmura Sumitada (1533-June 23, 1587) Japanese daimyo lord of the Sengoku period. He achieved fame throughout the country for being the first of the daimyo to convert to Christianity following the arrival of the Jesuit missionaries in the mid-16th century. Following his baptism, he was known as “Dom Bartolomeu”. Sumitada is also known […]

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by / on June 1, 2011 at 9:17 am / in Interesting Japanese Christians!

Nitobe Inazō

  Nitobe Inazō From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Nitobe Inazō (新渡戸 稲造, 1 September 1862 – 15 October 1933) was a Japanese agricultural economist, author, educator, diplomat, politician, and Christian during Meiji and Taishō period Japan. Early Life Nitobe was born in Morioka, Mutsu Province (present-day Iwate Prefecture). His father was a retainer to the local daimyō of the Nambu […]

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by / on March 30, 2011 at 3:07 am / in The Protestant Missions

The danger of becoming Luke warm!

The cause: Some of the causes of the lull in Christian work were in the Church itself. The early fervor had to some extent passed away. Whereas all of the Christians had once felt the responsibility for telling others about their new faith, and had been earnest in leading their friends to accept it, they were now inclined to leave […]

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by / on March 30, 2011 at 2:29 am / in The Protestant Missions

Tumultuous times for Japan!

The assassination of Viscount Mori Important political events excited the minds of the people and made it harder to gain their attention for the consideration of Christianity. February 11, 1889, the new Constitution was promulgated. The conflict of new and old ideas was exemplified the same day by the assassination of Viscount Mori, the Minister of Education, because of an […]

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by / on March 30, 2011 at 2:08 am / in The Protestant Missions

The beginning of stumped growth!

Many reasons: JAPAN is a country of sudden changes. The bright prospects that gave rise to the hope that the country would be speedily evangelized were soon clouded over. Missionaries are usually optimists, and it seemed to most of them that the storm would quickly pass and the sun would then shine out as brightly as before. In the correspondence […]

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by / on March 29, 2011 at 8:59 am / in The Protestant Missions

The end of rapid growth!

Some statistics The period of rapid development may be considered as closing with the year 1888. The check was not so sudden that the succeeding years did not show considerable growth; such growth, indeed, as in some other countries would have filled the hearts of missionaries with great joy. Those in Japan had seen such rapid growth that their hopes […]

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