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by / on March 10, 2011 at 6:25 am / in The Protestant Missions

Mrs. Mary Greenleaf Clement Leavitt and the Christian Temperance Society.

The year 1886 witnessed a renewed interest in the cause of temperance. This was aroused by lectures delivered in many cities by Mrs. Mary Greenleaf Clement Leavitt, who had come from America as the representative of the Woman’s Christian Temperance Union. Several temperance societies were formed under Christian auspices, though in many cases persons of other faiths became members. One […]

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by / on March 10, 2011 at 6:07 am / in The Protestant Missions

Girls desperation for education resulted in suicide!

A school opens in Niigata Somewhat similar to the history of the first of these Sendai schools was that of one opened in Niigata, although in this case the leading trustees were Christians. The school met with much opposition from Buddhists and others. It also suffered from internal dissensions; one of its presidents and afterwards the principal of the school […]

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by / on March 5, 2011 at 1:16 pm / in The Protestant Missions

The Story of Tohoku Gakuin!

The desire for Western civilization was naturally accompanied by increased interest in the study of the English language. In 1885 forty thousand books were imported from England and fifty-nine thousand from America; while in 1886 the numbers increased to eighty-five thousand and one hundred and nineteen thousand respectively. The efforts of the Government to have English taught in the public […]

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by / on March 5, 2011 at 12:08 pm / in The Protestant Missions

Educating girls of the higher classes.

Professor Toyama of the Imperial University: Several essays published in 1886 by Japanese writers are noteworthy for the favourable, though patronising, tone in which they speak of Christianity. Professor Toyama of the Imperial University, in an article on the education of girls, said that it would be a great advantage if they could be instructed by European or American ladies. […]

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by / on March 4, 2011 at 1:43 pm / in The Protestant Missions

Reaching the Ainu in Japan!

Three new missions in Japan In 1885 three new missions began work in Japan. They were those of the Presbyterian Church of the United States, of the American Society of Friends, and of the Evangelical Protestant Missionary Society (German and Swiss). As this last society is not well known by American and English Christians, and as its principles and methods differ […]

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by / on January 11, 2011 at 3:39 am / in Interesting Japanese Christians!

Masanao Nakamura

Nakamura was one of the first prominent Japanese philosophers to convert to Christianity, which he tempered with Confucian humanism and belief in the innate goodness of humanity. He viewed Christianity as the foundation for the military and economic strength of the western nations, and stated that Japan needed to discard its traditional beliefs as a necessary step in strengthening the […]

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by / on January 11, 2011 at 3:32 am / in Interesting Japanese Christians!

Fukuzawa Yukichi

Fukuzawa Yukichi (福澤 諭吉?, January 10, 1835 – February 3, 1901) was a Japanese author, writer, teacher, translator, entrepreneur and political theorist who founded Keio University. His ideas about government and social institutions made a lasting impression on a rapidly changing Japan during the Meiji Era. He is regarded as one of the founders of modern Japan.

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by / on January 11, 2011 at 3:03 am / in Uncategorized

Raised from the Dead!

Raised from the Dead

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by / on November 22, 2010 at 10:58 pm / in The Protestant Missions

Shinto and Buddhist Official Priesthood abolished and Yaso Taiji!

In August, 1884, the Government issued a notification to the effect that “the Shinto and Buddhist Official Priesthood has been abolished, and the power of appointing and discharging incumbents of religious temples and monasteries, and the promotion and degradation in rank of preceptors, has been transferred to the religious superintendents of those sects;” under certain regulations that were of such […]

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by / on November 22, 2010 at 10:15 pm / in The Protestant Missions

Aoyama Gakuin and Toyo Eiwa Gakko established!

The educational work carried on by the different missions kept pace with the rapid advance in other directions. Already in 1883 the Methodist Episcopal Mission had established in Tokyo the Aoyama Gakuin, comprising a theological school, a college, and an academy for boys; as also a seminary for girls. In 1884 the Canadian Methodists opened the Toyo Eiwa Gakko in […]

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