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by / on November 17, 2010 at 10:55 pm / in Uncategorized

Autumm in Kyoto!

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by / on November 17, 2010 at 10:44 pm / in The Protestant Missions

Mr. Fukuzawa Yukichi opposition to Christianity and Count Itagaki.

It will be remembered that so late as 1881 Mr. Fukuzawa Yukichi had published essays in which he opposed Christianity as dangerous to the nation, and had even gone so far as to urge that the Government take measures to prevent its extension. It seems very strange to find this leader of public opinion publishing only three years later an […]

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by / on November 17, 2010 at 10:06 pm / in The Protestant Missions

The Young Man from Doshisha and the Rebaiburu.

The year 1884 saw the movement in favour of Christianity extending and deepening. It was about this time that the word rebaiburu (revival) gained a place in the vocabulary of the Christians; and there was constant occasion for its use in connection with the spiritual awakenings that took place in the churches and Christian schools. One of the most marked […]

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by / on November 1, 2010 at 10:08 pm / in The Protestant Missions

The Day of Pentecost for Japan! (VI RAPID GROWTH I883-I888

We have now reached the time when the growth of the Protestant churches and the eagerness of the people to learn about Christianity were such as to arouse the highest hopes of the missionaries, and to excite the wonder of the whole Christian world. Many persons were led to ask the old question with a tone that implied an affirmative […]

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by / on October 29, 2010 at 9:48 pm / in The Protestant Missions

Joseph Cook, the well-known Boston lecturer, visited Japan in1882.

Joseph Cook, the well-known Boston lecturer, visited Japan in 1882, and through interpreters addressed many large audiences. He was the first of the noted Christian speakers from abroad that have gone to Japan for such purposes, and his vigorous words attracted much attention. He was invited to speak in Kyoto by some prominent members of the Prefectural Assembly. Hiring a […]

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by / on October 29, 2010 at 8:50 pm / in The Protestant Missions

All that shall live Godly in Christ Jesus, shall receive persecution!

The missionary correspondence of 1881 and succeeding years contained accounts of the mass meetings that were frequently held in theaters. The ordinary theatre of Japan is a large, bam-like structure, open to the roof, the wood-work unpainted, and without ornamentation except that of the furnishings of the stage. The floor is divided by low railings into what resemble small cattle-pens. […]

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by / on October 28, 2010 at 10:51 pm / in The Protestant Missions

The first Young Men’s Christian Association in Japan (1880).

The Young Men’s Christian Association among the Japanese was founded in 1880, in Tokyo. Rev. Messrs. Kozaki, Ibuka, Hiraiwa, and Uemura were prominent in the early days of the Young Men’s Christian Association society. Meetings of its members were held for religious and philosophical discussions, a small library was formed, and there were occasional evangelistic services. It formed the foundation […]

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by / on October 28, 2010 at 10:13 pm / in The Protestant Missions

Remarkable meeting held in the Public Park at Ueno, Tokyo.

October 13 and 14 a remarkable meeting was held in the Public Park at Ueno, Tokyo. A restaurant with its pounds was rented and services held from nine o’clock in the morning until five in the afternoon. There were prayers, the singing of Christian hymns, and addresses by both Japanese and foreigners. Dr. Verbeck thus described the exercises: “In the […]

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by / on October 28, 2010 at 9:48 pm / in The Protestant Missions

Opposition and the first translation of the Bible in Japanese!

Opposition, however, was not at an end. In Kyoto the local government instructed the ward officers to advise the people not to go to the houses of missionaries or to places where Christianity was preached, giving as a reason that the people already had a sufficient number of religions and those that were good enough. Two of the Japanese teachers […]

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by / on October 25, 2010 at 10:55 am / in The Protestant Missions

The Tango Obaa San, or Old Lady of Tango!

In, a small town in the province of Tango on the shores of the Japan Sea lived a woman whose story is here condensed from an account written by Rev. J. H. DeForest. She belonged to a family of some local importance, one of whose members had died in the year 1854. By the old calendar, which divided the years […]

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