Post Tagged with: "Christianity"

by / on June 17, 2011 at 1:18 am / in The Protestant Missions

Progress with the Ainu in Piratori. 1893!

A great advance was made in the Church Missionary Society’s work among the Ainu. In 1893 there was an increase from eleven church-members and two catechumens to two hundred and nineteen members and one hundred and fifty-one catechumens. The number of villages containing Christians increased from two to ten. Of one village Mr. Batchelor wrote: “Every woman in Piratori has […]

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by / on June 17, 2011 at 12:43 am / in The Protestant Missions

Persecution in Nagoya! Hired Soshi on a rampage against Christian Meetings.

Mention has been made of Nagoya as a city where Buddhism possessed much strength, and where its followers exerted themselves to oppose Christianity. Several incidents occurring in 1893 showed the bitterness of their hatred. In May the meeting of the Japanese Evangelical Alliance was held in that city. It was at that time the custom among politicians to hire a […]

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by / on June 13, 2011 at 1:34 am / in The Protestant Missions

A very severe attack upon Christianity by Professor Inoue Tetsujiro.1893!

Early in the year a very severe attack was made upon Christianity by Professor Inoue Tetsujiro of the Imperial University. He wrote an article that appeared simultaneously in six Buddhist and one Unitarian magazine. For a while it became the subject of controversy in all religious periodicals and to some extent in the secular papers. It was hailed with the […]

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by / on June 13, 2011 at 12:36 am / in The Protestant Missions

Important visits by prominent Christians to Japan! 1892

Dr. G. T. Ladd, Professor of Philosophy in Yale University: Mention should be made of three persons that visited Japan in 1892. Dr. G. T. Ladd, Professor of Philosophy in Yale University, came to deliver a course of lectures in the Doshisha. He also addressed the students of the Imperial University in Tokyo, and spoke before the Young Men’s Christian […]

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by / on June 11, 2011 at 12:41 am / in The Protestant Missions

No government post for Christians in 1891!

Official interference with Christian work increased. In one city where several military men had been brought into the church or into Christian clubs, officers of the grade of captain and lieutenants were told by superiors that they must stop trying to introduce Christianity into the ranks. In the Judicial Department men were told that the profession of Christianity was the […]

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by / on June 11, 2011 at 12:23 am / in The Protestant Missions

The Defection of Mr. Kanamori, a member of the “Kumamoto Band”.

It will be remembered that a company of young men commonly known as the “Kumamoto Band” had in spite of severe persecution entered into solemn covenant with each other that they would follow Jesus Christ and devote their lives to teaching His Gospel to their countrymen. They had been among the most prominent ministers of the Kumi-ai body and by […]

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by / on June 10, 2011 at 1:30 am / in The Protestant Missions

Reaching the Japanese immigrants in California, 1890!

It is fitting that some notice should be taken of the work that was being done for the Japanese residing in California, and an article published in The Church, July, 189O gives an account of its condition at that time. The number of Japanese then living in San Francisco was about two thousand, while from a thousand to fifteen hundred […]

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by / on June 10, 2011 at 12:39 am / in The Protestant Missions

The Apostles’ Creed!

In December, 1890, the Church of Christ in Japan (Presbyterian) held a synod in which it was decided to adopt as its Declaration of Faith the Apostles’ Creed, with the following Preamble: “The Lord Jesus Christ, whom we worship as God, the only begotten Son of God, for us men and for our salvation, was made man and suffered. He […]

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by / on June 10, 2011 at 12:07 am / in The Protestant Missions

Benefits of working in Unity!

Increased denominational variety was given by the coming of the mission sent by the Universalist General Convention of America. The first missionaries reached Japan in April, 1890, and under the leadership of Rev. George L. Perin soon erected a building to serve as a permanent center for their work. A theological seminary and an English school were opened, and soon […]

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by / on June 9, 2011 at 1:20 am / in The Protestant Missions

Emperor declares “The Imperial Rescript on Education”

October 30, 1890, the Emperor sent forth what has ever since been known as “The Imperial Rescript on Education,” a document that had a great influence on the religious history of Japan. The following is a translation issued in 1907 by the Department of Education: “Know ye, Our subjects: Our Imperial Ancestors have founded Our Empire on a basis broad […]

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