Post Tagged with: "Doshisha"

by / on June 20, 2011 at 1:25 am / in The Protestant Missions

Doshisha losing its Christian character!

There had gradually arisen among the missionaries of the American Board much dissatisfaction with the conduct of the Doshisha. As the affairs of that institution occupy considerable space in the history of this and succeeding years, it may be well to recall a few facts concerning it. It will be remembered that it had been established by Dr. Neesima in […]

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by / on June 9, 2011 at 1:03 am / in The Protestant Missions

Dr. Joseph Neesima, the very head of Christianity in Japan dies!

The Christian Church in Japan, and especially the Kumi-ai body, met with a great loss in the death, January 23, 1890, of Dr. Joseph Neesima. He had been in Tokyo and vicinity trying to interest influential men in his plans for a Christian university, when severe illness led him to seek rest at the seaside resort of Oiso. There he […]

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by / on March 29, 2011 at 4:14 am / in The Protestant Missions

In 1888 the Christian schools of Japan were at the height of their prosperity.

In 1888 the Christian schools of Japan were at the height of their prosperity. For example, the Doshisha had in its Theological Department 80 pupils; in the Academic Department, 410; in the Preparatory Department, 208; and in the Girls’ School, 180. One teacher wrote: “We should be quite overwhelmed with students if we had not made a strict resolution not […]

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by / on March 23, 2011 at 2:45 am / in The Protestant Missions

The great October, 1891, earthquake in Gifu and Ogaki-Mino-Owari earthquake!

In October, 1891, a terrible earthquake that had its center near the cities of Gifu and Ogaki, resulted in the loss of eight thousand lives, the wounding of fifteen thousand persons, and the complete or partial destruction of more than one hundred thousand houses. The missionaries living in Gifu and Nagoya at once exerted themselves to help the suffering. As […]

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by / on March 5, 2011 at 1:16 pm / in The Protestant Missions

The Story of Tohoku Gakuin!

The desire for Western civilization was naturally accompanied by increased interest in the study of the English language. In 1885 forty thousand books were imported from England and fifty-nine thousand from America; while in 1886 the numbers increased to eighty-five thousand and one hundred and nineteen thousand respectively. The efforts of the Government to have English taught in the public […]

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by / on November 22, 2010 at 10:58 pm / in The Protestant Missions

Shinto and Buddhist Official Priesthood abolished and Yaso Taiji!

In August, 1884, the Government issued a notification to the effect that “the Shinto and Buddhist Official Priesthood has been abolished, and the power of appointing and discharging incumbents of religious temples and monasteries, and the promotion and degradation in rank of preceptors, has been transferred to the religious superintendents of those sects;” under certain regulations that were of such […]

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by / on November 17, 2010 at 10:06 pm / in The Protestant Missions

The Young Man from Doshisha and the Rebaiburu.

The year 1884 saw the movement in favour of Christianity extending and deepening. It was about this time that the word rebaiburu (revival) gained a place in the vocabulary of the Christians; and there was constant occasion for its use in connection with the spiritual awakenings that took place in the churches and Christian schools. One of the most marked […]

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by / on October 28, 2010 at 10:13 pm / in The Protestant Missions

Remarkable meeting held in the Public Park at Ueno, Tokyo.

October 13 and 14 a remarkable meeting was held in the Public Park at Ueno, Tokyo. A restaurant with its pounds was rented and services held from nine o’clock in the morning until five in the afternoon. There were prayers, the singing of Christian hymns, and addresses by both Japanese and foreigners. Dr. Verbeck thus described the exercises: “In the […]

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by / on October 25, 2010 at 10:55 am / in The Protestant Missions

The Tango Obaa San, or Old Lady of Tango!

In, a small town in the province of Tango on the shores of the Japan Sea lived a woman whose story is here condensed from an account written by Rev. J. H. DeForest. She belonged to a family of some local importance, one of whose members had died in the year 1854. By the old calendar, which divided the years […]

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by / on October 21, 2010 at 11:32 pm / in The Protestant Missions

Baikwa Jogakko in Osaka and a school for the Blind in Tokyo!

In January, 1878, the two Congregational (or Kumi-ai, as they were afterwards called), churches in Osaka, each having about twenty-five members, opened the school for girls to which was given the name Baikwa Jogakko (Plum-blossom Girls’ School). Rev. H. Leavitt, a missionary of the American Board, was an earnest advocate of self-support, believing that the Christians should not depend on […]

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