Post Tagged with: "Japan"

by / on May 19, 2016 at 2:39 am / in Roman Catholic Missions

Hidden Christians in Rural Ibaraki, Osaka-fu.

Hidden Christians: A few days ago, I was invite by my good friend Mr. Satoh from the Kyoto Guide Club, to visit some od the sites related to the Hidden Christians in Japan. It was a fine spring day when we set out to the rural mountain village of Sendaiji in Ibaraki, Osaka Prefecture. It’s very quiet and peaceful there, […]

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by / on August 11, 2014 at 6:16 am / in Interesting Japanese Christians!, Roman Catholic Missions

Christian Martyrs 0f 1619 in Kyoto!

Christian Martyrs 0f 1619 in Kyoto! I would like to start with an apology to my readers, it’s been a while that I have posted a new segment of the Otis Cary book. I will do my best to continue where I left off. Thank you for your interest in this subject! Hugo for JCH. A good friend of mine, […]

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by / on July 13, 2012 at 1:40 am / in Interesting Japanese Christians!

Tojohiko Kagawa, Japan, Christian-Social Reformer!

Toyohiko Kagawa (賀川 豊彦) was a Japanese Christian pacifist, Christian reformer, and labour activist. Kagawa wrote, spoke, and worked at length on ways to employ Christian principles in the ordering of society and cooperatives. His vocation to help the poor led him to live among them. He established schools, hospitals, and churches. Kagawa was born in Kobe, Japan to a […]

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by / on January 24, 2012 at 6:54 am / in The Protestant Missions

Mr. Robert E. Speer’s Secretary of the N. Presbyterian Board Visits Japan!

At the time there was a dispute in the Japanese Church concerning who should hold the reigns. Should it be the Foreign missions or the national church.  The reverend Otis cary describes it in the following passage: “In the Church of Christ in Japan (Presbyterian) the question of the relation between the presbyteries and the foreign missions was vigorously discussed. The […]

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by / on January 17, 2012 at 7:36 am / in The Protestant Missions

Opposition from “Nihon Shugi”.

A movement that attracted considerable attention because of the University professors and other scholars who were its leaders aimed at a revival of Shinto. A magazine entitled Nihon Shugi (Japanese Principles) was published, and the movement was popularly known by the same name. The writers contended that Japan was in danger of losing her national characteristics by wholesale borrowing from […]

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by / on November 1, 2011 at 12:48 am / in The Protestant Missions

The old questions concerning the possibility of Christians being loyal to the Emperor.

Several events occurring in 1897 brought up the old questions concerning the possibility of Christians being loyal to the Emperor. Some of them gave rise to considerable discussion in the newspapers. A student was expelled from the Normal School in Yamaguchi because of a criticism he was said to have made upon the Imperial Rescript. The persecution was began by […]

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by / on September 6, 2011 at 4:29 am / in The Protestant Missions

Mr. Hara Taneaki, Pioneer of the Prison Ministry!

                                  It will be remembered that several Christians had been serving as moral instructors in the prisons of the Hokkaido. A change in administration brought in a superintendent strongly prejudiced against Christianity, who soon adopted such measures as made the instructors feel that it […]

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by / on September 6, 2011 at 4:12 am / in The Protestant Missions

The Gathering at Viscount Matsudaira in 1896!

In September, 1896, there was a gathering at the villa of Viscount Matsudaira in Tokyo, of prominent persons connected with different religious systems. Nineteen Buddhist priests, sixteen Christians, two Shintoists, and five other persons were present. The professed object of the meeting was to promote friendly feelings between those of different beliefs. The speakers, as was natural, emphasized the similarities […]

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by / on June 20, 2011 at 3:09 am / in The Protestant Missions

Leprosy in Japan! Three Christians instrumental in their care!

Leprosy is very common in Japan. Exact statistics are not obtainable; for the disease is considered to bring such disgrace upon the family which it enters that its existence is often concealed. When the family is in comfortable circumstances, the patient is usually shut off in a separate room in order that he may not be seen by outsiders, and […]

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by / on June 20, 2011 at 1:54 am / in The Protestant Missions

The Salvation Army began work in Japan. 1895!

In September, 1895, the Salvation Army began work in Japan. Before this, two or three Japanese who had seen something of the Army in America or England had copied certain of its methods, but none of them had any connection with the central organization. Those who now came began operations in both Yokohama and Tokyo. They adopted what was called […]

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