Post Tagged with: "otis cary"

by / on June 7, 2011 at 3:15 am / in The Protestant Missions

The Emperor grants religious freedom in 1889!

February 11, 1889, is an important date in the religious as in the political history of Japan; for in the Constitution that the Emperor then granted to his people. Article XXVIII. Declares: ” Japanese subjects shall, within limits not prejudicial to peace and order, and not antagonistic to their duties as subjects, enjoy freedom of religious belief.” It was but […]

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by / on June 7, 2011 at 2:50 am / in The Protestant Missions

The Army: another center of opposition to Christianity!

The Army seemed to be another center of opposition to Christianity, though the trouble experienced may have come from the commanders of the different garrisons. Soldiers were told not to attend Christian meetings nor to have Christian books in their possession. In some places Christian officers were pressed to withdraw from the membership of churches. The new Imperial Constitution, indeed, […]

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by / on June 7, 2011 at 2:40 am / in The Protestant Missions

The disastrous effect of the Plymouth Brethren!

Persons who had been prominent church-members were led to withdraw. In some places churches were almost broken up; in others, where churches were on the point of being organized; this became impossible because some of the believers went over to the Plymouth Brethren. If such persons had retained their faith, the result would have been less deplorable; but many who […]

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by / on June 7, 2011 at 2:04 am / in The Protestant Missions

The necessity of having a “Japanese Christianity”.

It was in accord with such sentiments that much began to be said about the necessity of having a “Japanese Christianity.” In 1890, Mr. Yokoi, a prominent Kumi-ai minister, published an article in which he lamented that Christianity as then existing in Japan was in most cases a copy of that found in England and America. In the early experiences […]

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by / on June 7, 2011 at 1:23 am / in The Protestant Missions

This is still true to this day! Amazing!

While the exaggerated nationalism of that time led to a higher appreciation of what was distinctively Japanese, the people had gone so far in accepting Western ideas that they could not wholly give them up. Hence, much was said about an alleged characteristic of the Japanese, namely, that while they gladly borrow what is good in foreign lands, taking now […]

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by / on June 7, 2010 at 9:56 am / in Roman Catholic Missions

EDICTS AGAINST THE CHRISTIANS REMOVED. PRISONERS FREED!

Rumors of a change in the policy of the Government increased. By the end of 1872, the exiles were receiving more lenient treatment, and there were many indications that brighter days were at hand. “EDICTS AGAINST THE CHRISTIANS REMOVED. PRISONERS FREED. INFORM ROME, PROPAGATION OF FAITH, HOLY INFANCY. NEED IMMEDIATELY FIFTEEN MISSIONARIES.” Such was the message written in March 1873, […]

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by / on June 4, 2010 at 11:18 pm / in Roman Catholic Missions

More Persecution!

November 12, in Hisakashima, a small island belonging to the Goto group, twenty-two heads of families were arrested and taken to the chief town of the islands. Immediately afterward, with the exception of six young men who escaped, the whole remaining population, men, women, and children one hundred and eighty-one persons in a ll, were shut up in the house […]

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by / on May 10, 2010 at 6:08 pm / in Roman Catholic Missions

Persecution 1867~1873 (part 2)

In October, 1867, Mgr. Petitjean went to France and Rome in order to plead the cause of his Mission. His attempts to induce Napoleon III. to make a  benevolent intervention in favor of the persecuted Christians were of no avail, the Emperor saying that nothing could be done except in concert with the other Powers. It was in the absence […]

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by / on May 10, 2010 at 5:39 pm / in Roman Catholic Missions

Persecution 1867~1873, Part 1

  It had been the custom of the Christians to avoid trouble by joining with others in making contributions to the temples, and by allowing deceased friends to be buried with Buddhist rites. Those in Urakami now resolved that, whatever might be the consequences, they would make no more girts to temples. In April, 1867, the relatives of a Christian […]

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by / on April 25, 2010 at 11:26 am / in Roman Catholic Missions

The Resurrected Church (1855-1867)

Though the United States in 1854 negotiated a treaty with Japan, this and the similar arrangements made by other Western nations did not provide for the residence of foreigners in the country. It was, however, evident that the first breach had been made in the barriers that shut the Japanese away from other peoples and that the time could not […]

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